Gelf Magazine - Looking over the overlooked

Covering Tennis Without A Net


What It's Like To Pick Up Tennis In Your 50s
Sports

Late To Tennis Practice

Gerald Marzorati began playing in his 50s. He got a book deal out of it—and a pretty good one-handed backhand.


Are the Olympics Broken Beyond Repair?
Politics

Are the Olympics Broken Beyond Repair?

Dave Zirin looks at the state of the Games, and it's not pretty.


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The Gelflog

Gelf Events Calendar

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August 17: Varsity Letters at The Gallery at LPR in Manhattan.


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August 17 Varsity Letters: Tennis Night

Varsity Letters, New York's sports reading series, returns to The Gallery at Le Poisson Rouge with a night devoted to tennis, including a look ahead to the U.S. Open and Serena Williams's quest for an Open-era record 23rd major title. At this event, hosted by Gelf, Caitlin Thompson, co-founder of Racquet Magazine—which is publishing its first issue later this month— and cohost of The Main Draw podcast, will be joined by Racquet contributor Gerald Marzorati, who also writes about tennis for newyorker.com and is the author of Late to the Ball, his tennis memoir; Bart Davis, co-author with Richard Williams of Black and White: The Way I See It; and Varsity Letters alum Tom Perrotta, who writes about tennis for The Wall Street Journal and is not the author of Little Children.

July 12: Olympics Night

Varsity Letters regular Dave Zirin will discuss his book Brazil's Dance with the Devil and what's really going down in Rio. He'll be joined by David Davis, author of Waterman: The Life and Times of Duke Kahanamoku, who'll discuss America's first superstar Olympic Swimmer. Dvora Meyers will read from and discuss her new book, The End of the Perfect 10: The Making and Breaking of Gymnastics' Top Score from Nadia to Now.

June 15: Remembering The Greatest

Gelf returns to The Gallery at Le Poisson Rouge with a night devoted to the legacy of Muhammad Ali and the writing he inspired. Robert Lipsyte, a longtime sportswriter who penned the fighter's New York Times obituary, will discuss what it was like to cover Ali. He'll be joined by Alex Belth, editor of Esquire Classic and curator for Deadspin's The Stacks, who'll read selections from some of the brilliant pieces of sports journalism Ali inspired. Brin-Jonathan Butler, who wrote and directed Ali vs Stevenson: The Greatest Fight That Never Was and authored The Domino Diaries, will speak as well.

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